ANTHY102-23B (HAM)

Exploring Cultures: Aotearoa and the Pacific

15 Points

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The University of Waikato
Academic Divisions
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences Office
Anthropology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: em.pooley@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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What this paper is about

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Tēnā koutou katoa, welcome to ANTHY102!

How might an anthropologist explain New Zealand society and culture, especially relations between its indigenous, settler, and migrant communities?This course looks at how our archipelago has been re-imagined and transformed over time, from the ancient isolate named Aotearoa by Maori, to becoming a far-off colony of Britain, to its emergence as a sovereign Pacific nation, and most recently as an outlier in an increasingly globalised world.

Academic rationale:

  • To provide a practically-oriented anthropology course at first-year level that complements our other discipline-focussed course (ANTH-101 Exploring Cultures: Introduction to Anthropology).
  • To offer an innovative paper that can be co-listed by other programmes at this University - e.g. Maori and Indigenous Studies, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, and New Zealand Studies/Akoranga Aotearoa.
  • To illustrate our programme’s international reputation for teaching and research excellence from the perspective of sociocultural anthropology, with a focus on Aotearoa/New Zealand and Te Moananui-a-Kiwa/The Pacific.

Employment Relevance:
This course is especially relevant to professional employment in: tourism; communications and media; teaching and education; Maori, Pakeha, Pasifika and immigrant communities; social work; ethnic relations; health and medicine; business; pastoral care; diplomatic service; aid and development; museums and cultural heritage; Treaty and historical research; the armed services; police and the law; politics and the public service.

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How this paper will be taught

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1. There are two lectures you must attend either in person or via panopto - Monday 4pm, S.1.04 and Thursday 1pm, L.G.04.

2. Students are required to attend a one hour tutorial class taken by one of the tutors for this course. These classes will serve two main aims. First, to reiterate and clarify any key points from the weekly lectures. Second, they will be used to encourage discussion of the allocated readings for that weekly period. As such, students will be expected to have done the prescribed readings, and to be ready to enter into shared discussion with other students and the tutor. These tutorial classes also are where students will receive more detailed information about assessment items. Further details on these will be provided in the first week of semester - when signing-up for a tutorial will be possible.

You should sign up for one of the weekly tutorial times using the tutorial sign up link on Moodle. Students are expected to regularly attend tutorials, starting from Week 2 of the semester. Rolls will be kept and part of your final grade will be awarded for attendance and participation.

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Required Readings

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There are 21 essential readings for this course, all of which will be provided on Moodle from the first week of semester. These should be read and studied in their order of occurrence, each alongside its corresponding lecture, class, and tutorial. To succeed in this paper, to ensure your success in the three tests, you must keep your reading up to date!
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Appreciate the relevance of anthropological perspectives for understanding human communities at the local, national, regional, and global levels, especially in combination with other social science disciplines
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate a mature understanding of the Aotearoa New Zealand and Pacific social and cultural contexts they daily interact with, and of this country’s interconnections with the wider world
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Illustrate improved abilities in listening, reading, discussing, writing, and analyzing in relation to social and cultural issues, consistent with international academic best-practice at university level
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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Please see below.
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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Moodle Quiz
19 Jul 2023
5:00 PM
1
2. Test One
10 Aug 2023
1:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Test Two
21 Sep 2023
1:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Tutorial Attendance
13 Oct 2023
5:00 PM
9
5. Test Three
19 Oct 2023
10:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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