APHYS111-23A (HAM)

Physics in Context - Ahupūngao o te Ao

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Science
Chemistry and Applied Physics

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What this paper is about

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This is an introductory paper in physics for students who have not studied much physics or mathematics at NCEA level 2 or 3. It is intended to support a major in other science subjects. Emphasis is placed on describing everyday physics concepts using correct terminology. Examples of physics in action are drawn from many science areas such as biology (e.g. photosynthesis), ocean science (e.g. ocean waves), geology (e.g. seismic effects) and chemistry (e.g. atomic effects). Topics include Newton's laws of motion; energy and heat, electricity and magnetism; vibrations and waves; the structure of matter and the universe. It is a Disciplinary Foundations paper for first year science and will provide opportunities for students to develop skills in scientific reading and information literacy, academic integrity, oral and written communication, numerical calculations and digital literacy.

While maths is kept to a minimum, this paper is not "maths free" and students need to be competent in rearranging equations (e.g. rearrange a = bc/d for c), using scientific notation (e.g. 6.02 times ten to the power 23) and entering large and small numbers into calculators, calculating means, and knowing what is meant by the sine of an angle.

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How this paper will be taught

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This paper consists of timetabled lecture sessions and laboratory sessions. However, the lecture sessions will be run in practice as a mix of lecture (talking about new material) and tutorial (including opportunities for students to work through problems).

Students will attend one laboratory session a week. The laboratory sessions are drawn from the Investigative Science Learning Environment in which students are asked to formulate their own experiments to test their own hypotheses; such an approach has been proven to lead to student learning in physics.

Please refer to the detailed timetable of events on Moodle for a full description of what activities happen when.

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Required Readings

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Recommended Readings (These are not required)

Hewitt, P. G. Conceptual Physics. 12th edition, Global edition. Pearson, 2015. This presents physics concepts without relying heavily on mathematics

Etkina, E., Gentile, M. J. and Van Heuvelen, A. College Physics, Pearson, 2012. This has a great presentation – built around the Investigative Science Learning Environment and works well with the laboratories – but its mathematical presentation is more than we expect of students for this paper

Cutnell, J., Johnson, K., Young, D. and Stadler, S., Jnes, H., Collins, M., Daicopoulos, J. & Blankleider, B. Physics, First Australian and New Zealand Edition. Wiley, 2021. This is a new textbook that is comprehensive (covers everything except astrophysics) and has a moderately low mathematics level.

Serway, R. A. and Vuille, C. College Physics, 11th edition, Cengage, 2018. This book is comprehensive and informative but it does use maths that may be beyond the abilities of some students.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Analyze heat flow in simple situations; describe how conduction, convection and radiation can be controlled
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  • Apply Newton's laws to calculate velocities, accelerations and forces in simple situations
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  • Calculate forces of interaction of charged particles with electric and magnetic fields
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  • Describe and explain everyday physics phenomena using terminology correctly, in both written and oral forms
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  • Describe the basic structure of the universe and be able to briefly discuss the evidence for this
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  • Describe the relationships between pressure, temperature and volume of an ideal gas and calculate forces due to fluid pressure
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  • Describe the structure of matter in terms of atoms and subatomic particles
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  • Describe transverse and longitudinal waves in terms of amplitude, velocity, frequency and wavelength, giving examples of wave phenomena
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  • Distinguish between Observational, Testing and Application experiments
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  • Give examples of resonance
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  • Undertake a laboratory experiment in physics; be able to make measurements, record and interpret results, reach an appropriate conclusion, and keep an accurate record of what was done
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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Assessment is composed of nine laboratory sessions (30% total), four assignments (5% each), two tests (5% each) and an exam (40%).

The laboratory sessions are assessed through a notebook that the student keeps in the lab and submits at the end of the lab.

The first three assignments are written; the fourth is a presentation done in a small group at the end of trimester.

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 40% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 60:40 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 40% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Laboratories
30
  • In Class: In Lab
2. Assignment 1
17 Mar 2023
4:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
3. Assignment 2
28 Apr 2023
4:00 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Assignment 3
19 May 2023
4:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: Faculty Information (FG Link)
5. Assignment 4
2 Jun 2023
2:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: In Lab
6. Test 1
6 Apr 2023
2:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
7. Test 2
26 May 2023
12:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
8. Exam
40
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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