COMPX301-23A (HAM)

Design and Analysis of Algorithms

15 Points

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Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences
Department of Computer Science

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: maria.admiraal@waikato.ac.nz
: buddhika.subasinghe@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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What this paper is about

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This course is for students interested in the art and science of computer programming. It is concerned with advanced data structures and their algorithms.

It involves a study of classical and recently discovered methods for solving a diverse range of computational problems. Analysis of important performance characteristics (such as efficiency, scalability, applicability, adaptability, and design) will also be addressed.

A survey of problem spaces and techniques for addressing specific examples using useful/interesting algorithms and data structures is offered. Examples typically include: string algorithms, data compression, pattern searching, external methods, dynamic programming, geometric algorithms, heuristic methods, and so forth.

The aim is to equip students to address future novel problems, and prepare them for industry and/or research careers. A key objective is to give students a deeper understanding of the connection between computing theory and practice. This course should be considered essential for computer scientists and software engineers.

The learning outcomes for this paper are linked to Washington Accord graduate attributes WA1-WA11. Explanation of the graduate attributes can be found at: https://www.ieagreements.org/

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How this paper will be taught

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The course is delivered in three lectures per week (with one optional tutorial session for students seeking additional help). There are four assignments, typically done in pairs, and two in-class tests.
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Required Readings

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Support material for select topics will be linked in the course Moodle page.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Analyse complex problems to select, modify and develop appropriate algorithms and data structures as solutions. (WA2, WA3, WA4)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Assignment 1 (1)
    Assignment 2 (2)
    Test One (3)
    Assignment 3 (4)
    Assignment 4 (5)
    Test Two (6)
  • Develop methods to address intractable problems using heuristic approaches. (WA3, WA4)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Assignment 4 (5)
    Test Two (6)
  • Implement artificial intelligence algorithms and use them to solve a problem. (WA3, WA4)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Assignment 4 (5)
    Test Two (6)
  • Model non-functional properties of algorithms using computational complexity methods. (WA2)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Test One (3)
    Test Two (6)
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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The internal assessment for this course will consist of four assignments (typically done in pairs) and one in-class test.

If you are enrolled on a BE(Hons), samples of your work may be required as part of the Engineering New Zealand accreditation process for BE(Hons) degrees. Any samples taken will have the student name and ID redacted. If you do not want samples of your work collected then please email the engineering administrator, Natalie Shaw (natalie.shaw@waikato.ac.nz), to opt out.

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Assignment 1
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Assignment 2
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Test One
20
  • In Class: In Lecture
4. Assignment 3
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Assignment 4
15
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Test Two
20
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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