ENGEN103-23G (HAM)

Engineering Computing

15 Points

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The University of Waikato
Academic Divisions
Division of Health Engineering Computing & Science
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences Office
Department of Computer Science

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: janine.williams@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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What this paper is about

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This paper provides an introduction to programming and problem solving using the MATLAB and Python programming languages. Emphasis is placed on applications to engineering problems. The paper covers basic programming concepts such as conditional statements, loops, functions, basic data types and data structures, and file input and output. This paper is designed primarily for students enrolled in the BE(Hons).

The learning outcomes for this paper are linked to Washington Accord graduate attributes WA1-WA11. Explanation of the graduate attributes can be found at: https://www.ieagreements.org/

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How this paper will be taught

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Content will be delivered by tutorials and labs held in-­person in the HAM campus, supported by lecture videos. Although tutorials and lab work can be done online if students cannot attend on campus. Tests and the exam will be held in­-person in the HAM campus labs.

Resources in the form of lecture notes, videos of lectures, course outline, background material, various user guides, lab and test sign ups, practice tests, sample code, data files and weekly quizzes will be made available through the course Moodle website. Also available on the course Moodle website will be support through various interactive forums. Class attendance is expected. The lecture material, tutorials and laboratory practicals are all integral parts of the paper. Failure to attend any of these means the student may miss material not presented elsewhere.

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Required Readings

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MATLAB: A Practical Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving (Fifth Edition)
by Stormy Attaway Ph.D. Boston University

Python for Computational Science and Engineering (on Github)
by Hans Fanghor Ph.D. Southampton

see Library Reading List

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You will need to have

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You are required to purchase a Lab and Tutorial Manual from Campus Copy. The manual contains the practical and tutorial descriptions. Other resources will be made available in the lab and via Moodle.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Apply a broad range of programming constructs and language supported data structures to process data including applying these constructs to solve engineering problems and working with large data-sets. (WA5)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Practical Test 1 (1)
    Practical Test 2 (2)
    Practical Test 3 (3)
    Practical Test 4 (4)
    Tutorial Hand Ins (10) (5)
    Moodle Quizzes (10) (6)
    Practical Exercises (10) (7)
    Written Test (Exam) (8)
  • Apply the computing principles and examples learned to new problems in an engineering context. (WA2)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Practical Test 1 (1)
    Practical Test 2 (2)
    Practical Test 3 (3)
    Practical Test 4 (4)
    Tutorial Hand Ins (10) (5)
    Moodle Quizzes (10) (6)
    Practical Exercises (10) (7)
    Written Test (Exam) (8)
  • Design, build and execute programs using both an editor and command-line tools. (WA3)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Practical Test 1 (1)
    Practical Test 2 (2)
    Practical Test 3 (3)
    Practical Test 4 (4)
    Practical Exercises (10) (7)
  • Explain in general terms a range of foundational computer science concepts, such as number systems, file systems, and algorithms. (WA1)
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Tutorial Hand Ins (10) (5)
    Moodle Quizzes (10) (6)
    Practical Exercises (10) (7)
    Written Test (Exam) (8)
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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Assessment submission and assessment is managed in different ways depending on the type of assessment. The assessment description will explain how your work will be assessed and how to submit it if that is required.

An overall mark of 50% and a minimum of 40% in the final exam is required to pass this paper. Students who fall just below these requirements may be awarded an RP grade which counts as a pass but does not permit the paper to be used as a pre-requisite. The final exam is the only ‘compulsory assessment item’. If you do not attend the exam, you will receive an IC grade for the paper (unless you make a successful special consideration application). Note that you are extremely unlikely to pass this paper by only completing the "compulsory" assessment item (the final exam)

Samples of your work may be required as part of the Engineering New Zealand accreditation process for BE(Hons) degrees. Any samples taken will have the student name and ID redacted. If you do not want samples of your work collected then please email the engineering administrator, Natalie Shaw (natalie.shaw@waikato.ac.nz), to opt out.

Please note that, as part of any assessment, students may be asked to complete an oral examination (viva voce) at a later date.

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Practical Test 1
24 Nov 2023
10:00 AM
3.5
  • In Class: In Lab
2. Practical Test 2
1 Dec 2023
10:00 AM
15
  • In Class: In Lab
3. Practical Test 3
8 Dec 2023
10:00 AM
3.5
  • In Class: In Lab
4. Practical Test 4
15 Dec 2023
10:00 AM
15
  • In Class: In Lab
5. Tutorial Hand Ins (10)
5
  • Hand-in: In Tutorial
6. Moodle Quizzes (10)
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. Practical Exercises (10)
20
  • Hand-in: In Lab
8. Written Test (Exam)
13 Dec 2023
2:00 PM
33
  • Hand-in: In Lecture
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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