IRSST331-23B (NET)

Cyber Security and the Global Politics of the Internet

15 Points

Edit Header Content
The University of Waikato
Academic Divisions
Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences Office
Political Science and Public Policy

Staff

Edit Staff Content

Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: frances.douch@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: em.pooley@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
Edit Staff Content

What this paper is about

Edit What this paper is about Content

IRSST331 Cyber Security and Cyber Warfare. This is a course about Cyber Security from an international relations perspective. We are interested in how states think about cyber security, and what policies they might devise to defend themselves from malicious actors, particularly but not exclusively other states. The course will be in three sections: first we will look at theories about the causes of war; then how national security strategies incorporate cyber security; finally current and future threats in the cyber realm.

Edit What this paper is about Content

How this paper will be taught

Edit How this paper will be taught Content
Online. Two prerecorded video lectures each week (30 minutes each), in some weeks a guest lecturer will replace the second video. Guests will be practitioners or international academics. They will also be recorded but the students will be invited to join the Zoom sessions.
Edit How this paper will be taught Content

Required Readings

Edit Required Readings Content

The readings below show the page numbers for the entire chapter. Students will be given shorter extracts in many cases by the lecturer.

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 1:

Thursday 13 July Cyber Security and Security as a Concept

Required reading: Barry Buzan. (1991) “Introduction” in “People, States & Fear.” Harlow: Pearson. pp.1-28

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 2:

Tuesday 18 July The Causes of War: Anarchy, Uncertainty, Power Distribution

Required reading: Brian C. Rathbun. (2007) “Uncertain about Uncertainty: Understanding the Multiple Meanings of a Crucial Concept in International Relations Theory.” International Studies Quarterly (2007) 51, 533–557

Recommended reading: Kenneth Waltz. (1979) “Anarchic Orders and Balances of Power” in “Theory of International Politics.” Boston : McGraw Hill. pp. 102-128

Thursday 20 July The Causes of War: Alliances/Democracy versus Non-Democracy

Required reading: Michael W. Doyle (1997) “Internationalism: Kent.” in “Ways of War and Peace.” New York: WW Norton and Co. pp.251-300

Recommended reading: Stephen Walt (1987) “Explaining Alliance Formation” in “The Origins of Alliances.” Ithaca: Cornell University Press. pp.17-49

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 3:

Tuesday 25 July The Causes of War: The Role of the Statesperson

Required reading: Stephen Van Evera. (1976) “False Optimism” in ”Causes of War: Power and the Roots of Conflict” Ithaca: Cornell University Press pp. 246-266

Thursday 27 July The Causes of War: Sovereignty, the National Interest and Grand Strategy

Required reading: Donald E. Nuechterlein. (1976) “National Interests and Foreign Policy: A Conceptual Framework for Analysis and Decision-Making.” British Journal of International Studies. Vol. 2, No. 3 (Oct., 1976),
pp. 246-266

Recommended reading: Nina Silove (2018) “Beyond the Buzzword: The Three Meanings of “Grand Strategy.” Security Studies, 27:1, 27-57. Monday 13 March

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 4:

Tuesday 1 August The Causes of War: Fortress States and Autarky

Required reading: Joseph Maiolo. (2012) “Cry Havoc: How the Arms Race Drove the World to War, 1931-1941.”
New York : Basic Books. pp.39-55

Thursday 3 August The Causes of War: Deterrence Theory and the Offence-Defence Balance

Required reading: Stephen Van Evera. (1976) “Offense, Defense and the Security Dilemma” in ”Causes of War: Power and the Roots of Conflict” Ithaca: Cornell University Press pp. 246-266

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Part Two: Cyber Security Strategies

Week 5:

Tuesday 8 August Cyber Security Policy: International Strategies

Recommended reading: Federal Government of Germany. (2023). “Robust. Resilient. Sustainable. Integrated Security for Germany. National Security Strategy.” pp.59-62

Recommended reading: Republic of Korea. (2023). “The Yoon Suk Yeol Administration’s National Security Strategy. Global Pivotal State for Freedom, Peace, and Prosperity” pp.135-139

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 6:

Tuesday 15 August Cyber Security Policy: National Strategies

Required reading: Florian J. Egloff & Max Smeets (2023) “Publicly attributing Cyber Attacks: a Framework.” Journal of Strategic Studies, 46:3, 502-533

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Part Three: Current and Future Threats

Week 9:

Tuesday 5 September Case Study: The Waikato Hospital Attack and Implications

Required reading: tbc

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 10:

Tuesday 12 September Case study: The Russo-Ukraine War and its Implications

Required reading: tbc

Thursday 14 September Lessons from Nuclear Deterrence, and the Implications

Required reading: Thomas Rid. (2012) “Cyber War Will Not Take Place.” Journal of Strategic Studies, 35:1, 5-32,

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 11:

Thursday 21 September Closed Networks

Required reading: Juha Kukkola. (2022) “The Russian National Segment of the Internet as a Source of Structural Cyber Asymmetry.” in A. Ertan, K. Floyd, P. Pernik, T. Stevens (Eds.) “Cyber Threats and NATO 2030: Horizon Scanning and Analysis.” Tallinin : NATO CCDCOE Publications. pp.9-30

Required reading: Ross J Anderson. “Network Attack and Defence.” in “Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems.” pp.367-390

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 13:

Tuesday 3 October The Future of Cyber Warfare

Required reading: Lawrence Freedman. (2017) “Cyberwar” in ”The Future of War: A History”. Allen Lane. Pp. 230-238

Recommended reading: Lennart Maschmeyer (2023) “A New and Better Quiet Option? Strategies of Subversion and Cyber Conflict.” Journal of Strategic Studies, 46:3, 570-594

Thursday 5 October The Dynamics of Cyber Warfare

Required reading: Rebecca Slayton (2016) “What Is the Cyber Offense-Defense Balance?: Conceptions, Causes, and Assessment.” International Security, Volume 41, Number 3, Winter 2016/2017, pp. 72-109

Recommended reading: Brandon Valeriano. (2022) “The Failure of Offense/Defense Balance in Cyber Strategy.” The Cyber Defense Review. Summer 2022. Vol.7, No.3. Westpoint: Army Cyber Institute/West Point Press. pp.91-101

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Week 14:

Tuesday 10 October Cyber Security and Outer Space

Required reading: Wesley Wark “The Five Eyes in Space. A New Frontier for an Old Intelligence Alliance” CGI Online. pp.497-502

Edit Required Readings Content

You will need to have

Edit You will need to have Content
Not applicable
Edit You will need to have Content

Learning Outcomes

Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the major theoretical approaches to cyber security and the internet
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Explain the technical challenges associated with protecting digital infrastructure
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Identify the major political and strategic debates surrounding cyber warfare, cyber terrorism and cyber crime
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Critically evaluate how nation states and non-state actors are involved in and responding to cyber security issues
    Linked to the following assessments:
Edit Learning Outcomes Content
Edit Learning Outcomes Content

Assessments

Edit Assessments Content

How you will be assessed

Edit How you will be assessed Content

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Essay One: 1500 words, worth 20% of final mark
4 Aug 2023
11:30 PM
20
2. Essay Two: 1500 words, worth 20% of final mark.
1 Sep 2023
11:30 PM
20
3. Essay Three: 3000 words, worth 30% of final mark.
13 Oct 2023
11:30 PM
30
4. Short Reading Reports (x6) 400-500 words
30
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
Edit Assessments Content