LEGAL437-23A (HAM)

Public International Law

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
Te Piringa - Faculty of Law

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: carolyne.taylor@waikato.ac.nz
: em.pooley@waikato.ac.nz

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What this paper is about

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An introduction to public international law: evolution, sources, relationship between international and municipal law, the law of treaties, the law of the sea and international institutions, particularly the United Nations.
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How this paper will be taught

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This is an A Trimester paper. The teaching component comprises a 2 hour lecture every week. This is a asyncronous FLEXI paper. This means lectures will be live and in person (as much as circumstances permit) and also recorded.

1. Professor Gillespie's office hours are every Wednesday during term time, 1pm to 3pm. He is also available via email and zoom, within the normal hours of the working week.

2. Professor Breen's office hours every Tuesday from 11am to 1pm. She is also generally available by email and zoom (by appointment) between 9am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.

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Required Readings

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The required readings will be posted each week on Moodle. Each lecture will be accompanied by some readings. The generic text that we recommend is Malcolm Shaw's International Law (9th ed, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2021).

And when doing the essays, do not forget Coppard, McLay, Murray & Orpin-Dowell New Zealand Law Style Guide (3rd ed, Thomson Reuters, 2018).

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You will need to have

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Recommended Readings

In addition to these materials, the Law Library holds a number of highly relevant textbooks on public international law. Specific recommended reading texts include:

Jan Klabbers International Law (2nd ed, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2017)

Malcolm Evans International Law (5th ed, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2018)

Malcolm Dixon Textbook on International Law (7th ed, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2013).

Don Rothwell International Law: Cases and Materials with Australian Perspectives (2nd ed, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, 2014)

Ian Brownlie, Principles of Public International Law, (8th ed, Oxford University Press, Oxford: 2012)

DJ Harris Cases and Materials on International Law, (7th ed, Thomson/Sweet & Maxwell, London, 2010)

A Abass International Law: Text Cases and Materials (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2012)

Other recommended readings will be placed on library desk reserve throughout the year.

Further material may be provided on the paper site on Moodle (http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz), the University of Waikato’s online learning system. Any such material is provided on the following terms:

University of Waikato owns the intellectual property rights, including copyright, in and to this site, or has acquired the necessary licenses to display the material on the site. As a student of the Te Piringa Faculty of Law, you are granted a limited license to use (access, display or print a single copy) the material from the papers in which you are enrolled for the purposes of participating in the paper only, provided the information is not modified. Materials may not under any circumstances be copied, stored, distributed or provided in any form or method whatsoever to any third party. Any other use of the material is prohibited. None of the material may be otherwise reproduced, reformatted, republished or re-disseminated in any manner or form without the prior written consent of University of Waikato. To obtain such consent, please contact the Te Piringa Faculty of Law.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Critically examine public international law
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of the basic laws, rules and procedures that operate in public international law
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the applicable rules governing international law
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Demonstrate understanding of the specifics of the law-making process in public international law and the intended and unintended consequences of present-day rule-making processes with regards to the politics and philosophy that dominates some of these
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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The assessment for this paper is research based. All assessment components will allow students to strengthen their research skills developed during the course and develop particular expertise in given subject-matter areas. They are intended to examine whether students have understood the contextual constraints associated with public international law, grasped the functions of public international law, gained sufficient knowledge of the laws, procedures and institutions which comprise public international law; thus being able to develop a deeper understanding of public international law, and critically analyse public international law.

Students will need to complete both pieces of assessment. Alternative arrangements will be made for students requiring special consideration, as per the process outlined later in this paper outline.

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Mid-semester essay
28 Apr 2023
12:00 PM
50
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. End-of-semester essay
2 Jun 2023
12:00 PM
50
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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