MAORI302-22A (HAM)

Mātauranga Māori, Indigenous Knowledges

15 Points

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: ngawaiata.henderson@waikato.ac.nz

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Paper Description

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This paper is a study of Mātauranga Māori & Indigenous Knowledges encapsulated within customs and practices that have evolved from traditional times to the present and looks forward to the future.

The paper content will be delivered in four ways:

  1. through a series of workshops with guest speakers introducing the main themes and ideas associated with Mātauranga Māori and Indigenous Knowledges;
  2. through on-line tutorials that will enable you to explore these themes as a group drawing on your own observations, experiences and readings;
  3. through a programme of directed reading which feeds into tutorials and assignments. It is expected that all students will have read the course readings prior to class for discussion;
  4. through online resources via Moodle.
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Paper Structure

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This is a A trimester paper. There are 3 contact hours per week consisting of a two-hour lecture on Tuesdays and a one hour tutorial on Friday. You are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials. Outside of these hours, I will be available for you to contact me via Moodle communication in the Communication portal. Each week one of our lecturers will be invited to share their expertise from their particular research areas. The paper is divided into 3 modules; (i) Tradition and knowledges (ii) Expressions and forms of mātauranga; and (iii) Institutional and policy application of mātauranga and Indigenous knowledges.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the whakapapa and traditional knowledge underpinning Mātauranga Māori and associated key cultural concepts - where does your knowledge come from?

    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Describe the whakapapa underpinning Mātauranga Māori

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  • Illustrate comprehension of the influence and forms that Mātauranga Māori has had and has taken in various postcolonial formations - present expressions and forms of Mātauranga Māori
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  • Critique institutional/government policies to identify whether and how Mātauranga Māori informs policy and contributes to a new creativity
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  • Analyze the relationship between past, present and developing Mātauranga Māori
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment is important to help you and the lecturer understand how you are grappling with the knowledge shared, course material and to track how you are understanding and using the key ideas of the course. The assignments help consolidate your understandings by focussing your thinking and writing into a specific area of thinking. Take assignments seriously and do the background preparation well ahead of the due date of an assignment. The habit of handing in an assignment on time is the most important habit to acquire at this stage. The second most important habit is to demonstrate that you have prepared for the assignment. You do this by attending lectures and attending tutorials where ideas are explored further. Reviewing Panopto recordings also help in addition to reading the relevant materials and showing that you have thought independently about the topic you are writing about or discussing. The third most important habit is to reference your work, the authors you have read, the people and resources that have helped you form your ideas, using the APA style that the Faculty recommends. These habits help ensure the integrity of your work and doing this should prevent any risk of plagiarising the work of others.

There are 4 assessment items for this paper. There are no compulsory components in this paper. However, to gain maximum understanding of content and to pass this paper successfully it is essential that you attend all lectures and tutorials and submit all assignments.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Reflections on Mātauranga
22 Apr 2022
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Poster Presentation
20 May 2022
No set time
20
  • Other: Presentation via Zoom
  • In Class: In Tutorial
3. Essay
6 Jun 2022
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Critical Analysis
24 Jun 2022
5:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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General Readings:

Latulippe, N. (2015). Situating the work: A typology of traditional knowledge literature. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 11(2): 118–131.

SUPERU. (2018). Bridging Cultural Perspectives. SUPERU, Wellington.

Specific Readings:

: Mercier, O. R., Stevens, N. & Toia, N. (2012). Matauranga Maori and the data-information-knowledge-wisdom hierarchy. Mai Journal, 1, 103-116

: Peter Adds (2012). E Kore Au E Ngaro Ancestral Connections to the Pacific. In Tangata o le Moana New Zealand and the People of the Pacific. Edited by Sean Mallon, Kolokesa Mahina-Tuai and Damon Salesa.

: Angus Macfarlane & Sonja Macfarlane (2019) Listen to culture: Maori scholars’ plea to researchers, Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 49:sup1, 48-57, DOI: 10.1080/03036758.2019.1661855.

: Chapter 5: Ko te kura roa - Opotiki Mai Tawhiti. In Maxwell, T. K. (2019). Te Kaunati Hikahika a Opotiki Mai Tawhiti: Ka hika i taku ahi, kimihia e Te Whakatohea te ara o te tikanga i pai ai te noho i te ao nei (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.

: Smith, L., Maxwell, T.K., Puke, H., & Temara, P. INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE, METHODOLOGY AND MAYHEM: WHAT IS THE ROLE OF METHODOLOGY IN PRODUCING INDIGENOUS INSIGHTS? A DISCUSSION FROM MATAURANGA MAORI. Knowledge Cultures 4(3), 2016, pp. 131–156, ISSN 2327-5731, eISSN 2375-6527

Students will be directed to any required readings which will be accessible through Moodle.

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Other Resources

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From time to time, other resources will be posted in Moodle for students learning.

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Online Support

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Moodle:

This paper is supported by Moodle. Moodle is the eLearning platform of this university that is used to foster student interaction related to learning. This paper can be accessed by visiting: https://elearn.waikato.ac.nz/course/view.php?id=40130

Panopto:

This paper is also supported by Panopto. Panopto - Course Cast is a tool which allows users to record audio, video, Power point and what is happening on the user's computer screen or in class. Panopto recordings can be accessed by visiting http://coursecast.its.waikato.ac.nz/CourseCast/

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Workload

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This paper is taught in English. Readings can be accessed from the Moodle page. Māori302 is a 300 level paper. This paper has 3 contact hours weekly. Students are expected to attend lectures and tutorials and complete the required readings and assessments. If we consider that the 'normal' annual hours for a Bachelors degree is seven papers, we can then calculate that on the basis of a 16 week semester (including recess and study periods) the student should then spend around 10-12 hours per week on average working on the paper. This includes attending lectures, tutorials, completing assessed work and reading and reviewing.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: TIKA163 or MAORI102 or MAORI204

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

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