PACIS200-23B (HAM)

Pacific Migration, Diaspora and Identity

15 Points

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The University of Waikato
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Te Pua Wananga ki te Ao Office
Te Pua Wananga ki te Ao

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: ngawaiata.henderson@waikato.ac.nz

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What this paper is about

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Kia ora, Malo e lelei, Talofa lava, Kia orana, Hafa adai, Fakaalofa lahi atu, Taloha ni, Bula si'a, Kam na mauri, Halo Olgeta! Warm Pacific greetings and welcome to PACIS200-23B.

This trimester, we are thinking about the significant experiences of migration and diaspora that have strongly shaped many Pacific communities and that have contributed a great deal to where we live now. We will consider these questions:

What is it that prompted Pacific families to depart the home nation?

What were some of the aspirations they sought?

We will focus on the specific experiences of Pacific people in Aotearoa New Zealand, including the Waikato and we will think about Pacific Aotearoa New Zealand in the context of Pacific migrations to other diasporic sites.

You will also be invited to share of your culture and background in relation to family voyages.

Along the way, we will keep thinking about many of the things that are important to the disciplines of Pacific Studies and Indigenous Studies: the importance of Indigenous knowledges and perspectives, the many forms colonial violence and anti-colonial resistance, the significance of culture and language, and the range of connections between different Indigenous people.

Every person in this paper has a connection to the topics we are exploring this semester. Bring your whole self to class and to your assignments - your perspective, experiences, and questions matter here.

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How this paper will be taught

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PACIS200 will take place in person with accompanying resources provided through Moodle each week. It is designed for relational learning in which the class as well as the teacher contribute to learning content. Therefore, learners are advised to be present in all lecture sessions.

Some lecture material from each week will be recorded via Panopto. However, the recordings will not include all class content and interactions.

Panopto recordings are provided for revision purposes and situations in which learners cannot attend class for a specific reason. They should not be used ongoingly as a substitute for in person attendance, since this paper is designed for face to face learning.

Tutorials start in week two. Details of this will be discussed in lectures during week one.

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Required Readings

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Most weeks you will have required readings; these will be available electronically in the Reading List for our class available through Moodle.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts such as migration, diaspora, identity and indigeneity especially in relation to how they have been engaged in Pacific Studies
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Describe key features of Pacific migration through case examples
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  • Describe the historical and contemporary experiences of Pacific peoples in Aotearoa/New Zealand
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  • Understand Pacific diaspora in New Zealand in the broader context of of Pacific diasporas in other Pacific sites, Australia, the US and beyond
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessments

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How you will be assessed

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Online Discussion/Reflection Forum held fortnightly (due Fridays)
21 Jul 2023
11:30 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Journal article review
24 Jul 2023
11:30 PM
25
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Migration journeys assignment
6 Oct 2023
11:30 PM
35
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Participation
29 Sep 2023
11:30 PM
10
  • In Class: In Lecture
  • In Class: In Tutorial
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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