PSYCH319-21B (HAM)

Infant and Child Development

15 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Psychology

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: alistair.lamb@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This paper will provide students with an overview of the major theories, methods and findings of developmental psychology, with a focus on those that pertain to infancy and childhood. Students will become familiar with the major paradigms for understanding child development, and their strengths and limitations, as well as the implications of various approaches for methods of research and social interventions.

The paper will discuss current research questions and methods, focusing on key questions in physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development during infancy and childhood. Students will be encouraged to think systematically about questions in the field, to go beyond the anecdotal evidence that is so pervasive in thinking about children, and to consider how to go about asking and answering questions that take into consideration the complex factors that contribute to development.

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Paper Structure

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Wednesday classes will include both lecture and large and small group discussions. Friday classes are generally structured with a large proportion of interactive activities, and will be held in person, with Panopto recordings available for those who are unable to attend. There will be three tests during the semester, held during the Friday class time, but administered online. Assessments include tests that cover information and theories, article critiques where students practice careful critical reading of an empirical article in developmental psychology, and observation assignments where students apply the concepts of developmental psychology to their observations of children. Some aspects of assignments and class structure may need to be adapted if there are changes in pandemic threat level.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to:

  • describe major psychological approaches to understanding child development
    Linked to the following assessments:
    In-class Test 1 (2)
    In-class test 2 (5)
    In-class Test 3 (7)
  • identify developmental changes in physical, cognitive, social, and emotional functioning during infancy and childhood and be able to recognise how these manifest in observing children
    Linked to the following assessments:
    In-class Test 1 (2)
    Observation Assignment: Plan (4)
    In-class test 2 (5)
    In-class Test 3 (7)
    Observation Assignment: Final report (8)
  • understand research methodologies used in empirical developmental psychology, and understand and critique reports of research in the professional or popular literature.
    Linked to the following assessments:
    Practice Article Critique (1)
    In-class Test 1 (2)
    Article Critique (AC) I (3)
    Article Critique (AC) II (6)
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Assessment

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Paper Requirements:
To get the most out of this paper, you should participate actively in both Wednesday and Friday classes, and in order to do this, you should complete the reading before attending class. The marked assessments of the paper are one observation assignment, three article critiques (one practice completed in lab, two completed independently), and three in-class tests. The intent of all of these assessments is to help you to master the concepts, knowledge and skills involved in this area. It will all work best if you use the text in an active and timely way to prepare for class and for your assignments.

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Practice Article Critique
23 Jul 2021
5:00 PM
5
  • Hand-in: In Lab
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. In-class Test 1
30 Jul 2021
3:00 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Article Critique (AC) I
13 Aug 2021
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Observation Assignment: Plan
19 Aug 2021
11:30 PM
5
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. In-class test 2
10 Sep 2021
4:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
6. Article Critique (AC) II
1 Oct 2021
11:30 PM
10
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
7. In-class Test 3
15 Oct 2021
4:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
8. Observation Assignment: Final report
26 Oct 2021
11:30 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Arnett et al. (2020) Child Development:A Cultural Perspective, Australian and New Zealand edition, Pearson

Chapters associated with the week's topic are shown in the "Class in a Nutshell" document on Moodle, and on the Moodle page. Read the chapter(s) before the Wednesday class.

NOTE: there are different editions of this text for different regions. Be sure you get the Australia/NZ edition (it's also cheaper than the overseas one, so you'll be glad). The text is available in the university bookstore, or Pearson.com.au has both softcover and e-book and rental available. The library will have a copy on reserve, but you need to read it in the library, and since this is the main source of readings for this class, I recommend that you purchase or rent the text.

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Online Support

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Whenever possible, notes for Wednesday classes will be posted on Moodle before noon on Wednesday, so you have access to them before the class. Friday classes and labs will include small group quiz review, activities, discussion, questions, and videos/observation, so prepared notes will not always be available, but materials used in the sessions (e.g., handouts) will be posted on Moodle. Wednesday and Friday classes will typically be recorded, but technical glitches do occur, so that can’t be guaranteed, and there are activities that are not conducive to recording, so you are strongly encouraged to attend class, and use the recordings for review. The classes will not be simply review of the material in the chapters—you are expected to read the chapters, and the class sessions will be expansion and use of the concepts and information in the chapters. Please feel free to ask questions about the reading material if you have any trouble understanding it, either before, during, or after class sessions, or at office hours.

A copy of the outline and other resources (e.g., information and consent forms for observation, articles for article critique) is posted on Moodle, and your assignments will be submitted using Moodle; if you are having any difficulty accessing Moodle, please consult the IT helpdesk as soon as possible. You DO NOT have to hand in hard copies of assignments.

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Workload

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The amount of work expected of a typical student in a 15 point paper (offered over one semester) is approximately 10 hours per week throughout the trimester, including teaching break and study weeks. This figure is only approximate, as papers vary in their requirements and students vary in both the amount of effort required and the level of grades they wish to achieve.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: PSYCH211 or PSYC208 or permission of the convenor.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: PSYC319

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