SOCIO507-22A (NET)

The Regulation of Sexuality

30 Points

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Division of Arts Law Psychology & Social Sciences
School of Social Sciences
Sociology and Social Policy

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: rosie.webb@waikato.ac.nz

Placement/WIL Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: melanie.chivers@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5, 9 or 3 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 3: dial +64 7 2620 + the last 3 digits of the extension e.g. 3123 = +64 7 262 0123.
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Paper Description

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This paper examines the ways in which sexuality is regulated in contemporary western societies, and how this regulation affects both western and indigenous sexualities. Students will be introduced to theoretical understandings of regulatory practices, with a particular focus on sexuality, and will be given the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the ways in which the putatively 'natural' phenomenon of sexuality is in fact produced and constrained through various forms of discourse - in this instance, specific forms of regulation.

The intention is to create a space in which learning and discussion can occur related to the various ways in which sexuality is regulated, through legislation and policy, but also through regulatory regimes such as rules in educational institutions, the creation of knowledge through the collection of statistical data, and other mechanisms which overtly or implicitly regulate behaviour and action. A sociological lens will be used to understand how such regulation occurs and is maintained, whose interests are served, how those marginalised by such regulation are affected, and how regulatory practices shift over time in response to resistance, social change, political interests, and other factors.

This paper will address some potentially sensitive topics. The maintenance of a safe environment for learning and discussion is of paramount importance. This will be discussed in the first week of the paper.

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Paper Structure

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SOCIO507 will be delivered through weekly three-hour workshops, involving some delivery similar to lectures, sustained discussion, presentations, and workshopping ideas related to content and assessment. Students are expected to have done the required readings prior to each session - this is a requirement for participation in the week's session. Each student will lead a workshop of their choice (see further information in the Assessment section).
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • demonstrate sociological and analytical skills.
    Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate sociological research and analytical skills relevant to the study of regulatory regimes and sexuality, including the ability to interpret theoretical perspectives and apply such perspectives to real world examples.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • demonstrate an understanding of the construction of sexuality.
    Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate an understanding of how sexuality is understood as 'natural' and related to 'biology', while simultaneously being subject to a wide range of explicit, implicit, and official forms of regulation.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • synthesise and communicate information, and construct arguments.
    Students will have the opportunity to synthesise and communicate information on regulation and sexuality from a broad range of sources and construct arguments that critically evaluate the ways in which sexuality is regulated, and how these regulatory regimes are challenged and changed.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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As SOCIO507 is a graduate paper, a high standard of work is expected in the assessments, both written and in class. Students are advised to ensure they give attention to details such as referencing, grammar, etc, as well as research and writing. Both Student Learning and the Library provide support to graduate students, and SOCIO507 students are encouraged to make use of these resources.
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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Engagement with readings and workshop content
10
  • In Class: In Workshop
2. Presentation and discussion facilitation
20
  • In Class: In Workshop
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Annotated bibliography
26 Apr 2022
12:00 AM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
4. Essay plan presentation
10
  • In Class: In Workshop
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
5. Research essay
23 Jun 2022
12:00 AM
40
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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As SOCIO507 is a graduate paper, there are significant expectations regarding readings. Two or three pieces of required reading will be allocated for each week's topic. (These will be listed on Moodle, and available through the paper's reading list.) Students must undertake all required readings before the relevant workshop in order to contribute meaningfully to discussions.
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Recommended Readings

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A range of additional recommended readings will be made available as relevant. While students are not required to undertake these readings for workshops, they are expected to refer to these if they are undertaking work on related topics.
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Other Resources

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Additional resources - video material, links to examples related to workshop topics, etc - will be made available via Moodle.
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Online Support

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This is a NET paper and is therefore delivered entirely online with support via Moodle. Online web address: http://elearn.waikato.ac.nz/ or you can click on the Moodle link on the university home page.

Resources directly related to the content of this paper are available via Moodle. Support with sourcing and referencing literature for assessments can be accessed via the Study and Research section of the library website (https://www.waikato.ac.nz/library/). Resources and support with all aspects of your academic studies can be accessed via the Student Learning website (https://www.waikato.ac.nz/teaching-and-learning/student-learning).

Notices are sent to the class via Moodle frequently. If a notice is sent out via Moodle, it is assumed that you have received it.

If, for any reason, you are unable to access Moodle, please advise Johanna so that alternative arrangements can be made until you do have access.

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Workload

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This paper is worth 30 points. As a full semester workload is 60 points, students should expected to devote 50% of a fulltime workload to this paper i.e. an average of 20 hours per week throughout the entire semester (including the teaching recess), including undertaking each week's readings, attending workshops, and reading, researching and writing for assessments.
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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Prerequisite papers: At least 15 points at 300 level within SOCIO, SOCPY or GNSEX or permission from the graduate advisor.

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

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